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Citation: Caine, Karen. (2008). Writing to Persuade: Minilessons to Help Students Plan, Draft, and Revise, Grades 3-8. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.


Title: Writing to Persuade: Minilessons to Help Students Plan, Draft, and Revise, Grades 3-8
ISBN:
ISBN-13:
Edition:
Year: 2008
Publisher: Heinemann
City: Portsmouth, NH
Medium: Book
Author(s): Caine, Karen
Grades: Third Grade to Eighth Grade
Category: Mentor Authors and Illustrators and Mentor Texts Responding to and Publishing Writing Revision Teaching the Writing Process Minilessons Persuasive Writing
Annotation: "Writing to Persuade" by Karen Caine is a book about teaching persuasive writing in the intermediate grades. She recommends teaching at least two persuasive units each year, starting a third of the way through, once you’ve established an environment of trust and introduced writing workshop. Karen states that persuasive writing helps students learn how to express an opinion, support it with evidence, and then convey their ideas with voice and conviction. Writing to Persuade contains sample persuasive units, a unit on reading persuasive writing, and a wealth of minilessons for collecting, selecting, and developing ideas, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing persuasive writing, as well as minilessons for this form of writing on standardized tests.

Karen writes that you can use this book in three different ways: to adopt a unit in the book, to adapt one of the units, or to create your own unit from scratch. The six units have a standard format, starting with “About This Unit,” followed by “Special Considerations,” preparation tips for “Before Students Begin to Write,” and “Day-by-Day Plans.” The format for the 57 specific minilessons includes information about preparation, the minilesson, ideas for sharing and follow-up, and, best of all, a section called “Possible Problems and Solutions” which alone is worth the price of the book. She explores many different kinds of persuasive writing, including editorials, op-eds, advertisements, articles, advice columns, reviews, and political cartoons. The book includes forms, samples by students and published writers, and persuasive writing exercises. This is exactly the practical book you need if you teach (or want to teach) persuasive writing in the intermediate grades or middle school.